Calton

Calton

 

OLD CALTON MAP:

Reproduced by kind permission of  Culture & Sprort Glasgow (Museums).

Copyright © Culture & Sport Glasgow (Museums).

Calton was originally known as Blackfauld reputedlybecause of the slag and debris created by surface mining.

BURGH of CALTON COAT OF ARMS:

Reproduced by kind permission of  Culture & Sprort Glasgow (Museums).

Copyright © Culture & Sport Glasgow (Museums).

The Coat of Arms shows feline beasts with shuttles in their mouths and the symbol is thought to refer to the Weavers Traditional Vow – “I will eat the shuttle ‘ere I reveal the secrets of the craft”.

THOMSONS LANE:

Reproduced by kind permission of  Culture & Sprort Glasgow (Museums).

Copyright © Culture & Sport Glasgow (Museums).

Thomsons Lane.

CALTON ENTRY:

Reproduced by kind permission of  Culture & Sprort Glasgow (Museums).

Copyright © Culture & Sport Glasgow (Museums).

Calton Entry.

An Old Close in The Calton by R. Eadie.

London Road at Kent Street.

The Entrance to Glasgow Green.  McLennans Arch.  I believe this is Charlotte Street.

Copyright © R J S Wiseman – Reproduced by kind permisdsion of Richard Wiseman

Tram 1140 on London Road at Green Street 30 August 1954.  At the side of the tram is the Calton Bar.

 

 copyright © calamity

Gallowgate /Abercromby Street 1970s

9 thoughts on “Calton

  1. Gilbert Baird ( Gibby Baird )

    I was a part-time barman in the Calton Bar around 1968/69.Mrs Mary Mason owned the pub at that time and her chargehand was Tommy Wilson.(His brother was a well known Scottish jockey namely J Wilson.) At the weekend when I worked, there was a local barman Tommy.(iforget his surname – sorry! Tommy.
    I worked part-time in many pubs and social clubs all over Glasgow. The Calton Bar was among the best of them, the beer was always in the best of order and the whisky they sold was what it said on the bottle. The calton Bar was not a ” wine shop “. although they served glasses of Dark and White wine from small barrels at the end of the gantry.The customers mainly locals and ex Caltonians made the shop what it was, they were full of characters and always had good patter.One gentleman had a local shop shop that did electrical repairs TVs and equipment ,he kept to himself and was known as “the Captain. The lounge was popular on a Saturday night Mr and Mrs Weaver were regulars she always sang the Mary Hopkins song “Those were the days ” . She gave smashing rendition. Gibby Baird ex part time barman.

    Reply
  2. agnes wilson

    I have looked everywhere looking for The Calton Bar but there was no record,so thank you i see you have it.My dad used to drink in there his local.we stayed in Stevenson St.

    Reply
  3. donna robertson

    Does anyone know of the Bomb Dairy in the Calton..said to be near Stevenson st/Bain st….. I dont know if it has anything to do with the Kent st bombing.

    Reply
  4. donna robertson

    I just noticed an answer I had got on another site.some time ago concerning the Kent st bombing and found this………………………… Unread post Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:06 pm #11
    my grandmother died in the bombing of kent street in Glasgow her name anna crolla and her daughter flora was also trapped I believe so sad I never got to know her i have a civilian certificate I sent for anna stating she gave her life for her country

    Reply
  5. Donna Robertson

    I noticed the building at Kent st that was bombed during the war… next to the chapell..I remember my mother telling me about Lord Haw Haw on the wireless working for the Germans saying they were going to bomb the Barrowland.. I wonder if that was true..

    Reply
  6. John McGuinness

    Re picture of London Road at Kent Street, it shows St Alphonsus’ chapel on the left where I was an Alter boy. My aunt also had a shop in Kent St. Crilleys which specialised in wrapping “gifts” bought at the Barras. I worked there sometimes. Now in Kent.

    Reply
    1. Donald Pollock

      Hi John, I’d be interested in hearing about Crilleys shop on Kent Street, which era was this? I’m aware a family of that name who lived in the area in the early 20th century.

      Reply
    2. Anne-Marie

      Annie Crilley was our neighbour ~ lived up our close at 29 Kent Street – right beside her shop. Lovely woman.

      Reply

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